Motivational Tip: enjoy every moment

 

Enjoy every moment by Saran P King

Saying life is short is definitely a cliché, but it really is very short. Do we want to spend this short life that was granted to us, complaining, being bitter and resentful, angry and unkind to others and ourselves? Or do we want to learn all we can, do all we can and enjoy all we can, before it’s too late. Think about it! Good and bad things happens to us all, and we can either choose to learn from these situations or be forever miserable about them. What path are you taking or going to take? As I reflect on my life and the life of others around me, I realize more and more that we have to be grateful for every day that is given to us, every breath that we take, every moment that we have here on earth. Someone can literally be here now and gone the next minute, it is that serious. If you are facing difficult times, seek help, pray, find a way to rise above the situation and make it out stronger. If you are seeing great times, enjoy it, be thankful, and if you are able share your abundance, share.

The following poem was written by Maya Angelou, in memory of Michael Jackson. And even though these words were written specifically for him, they can be applied to anyone who has lost their life. May their souls be forever at peace and may their love one(s) whose lives may have been affected by their death, also find peace as they continue their life journey without them.

 

 

We Had Him

Beloveds, now we know that we know nothing
Now that our bright and shining star can slip away from our fingertips like a puff of summer wind

Without notice, our dear love can escape our doting embrace
Sing our songs among the stars and and walk our dances across the face of the moon

In the instant we learn that Michael is gone we know nothing
No clocks can tell our time and no oceans can rush our tides
With the abrupt absence of our treasure

Though we our many, each of us is achingly alone
Piercingly alone
Only when we confess our confusion can we remember that he was a gift to us and we did have him

He came to us from the Creator, trailing creativity in abundance
Despite the anguish of life he was sheathed in mother love and family love and survived and did more than that

He thrived with passion and compassion, humor and style
We had him
Whether we knew who he was or did not know, he was ours and we were his
We had him

Beautiful, delighting our eyes
He raked his hat slant over his brow and took a pose on his toes for all of us and we laughed and stomped our feet for him

We were enchanted with his passion because he held nothing
He gave us all he had been given

Today in Tokyo, beneath the Eiffel Tower, in Ghana’s Blackstar Square, in Johannesburg, in Pittsburgh, in Birmingham, Alabama and Birmingham England, we are missing Michael Jackson

But we do know that we had him
And we are the world.

Maya Angelou
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Motivational Tip: Divided by strands

Martin Luther King Jr. said in his “I have a dream speech on the 28th August 1963, “All men are created equal.” Before that time even until now, people have been quick to point out the differences in each other that further divide them rather than to see the similarities that bring them closer together. And our hair is the same when it comes to being different in many ways.

Why are women AND men so fascinated over hair, their hair and other people’s hair, fake hair, coloured hair, natural and relaxed hair, short and long hair. We spend millions of dollars getting it styled, cutting and trimming it, adding colour and just to maintain it the way it is. Especially now, there has been a surge in the natural hair community worldwide, women every where spend thousands of dollars every year on a variety of hair products and accessories . It is certainly true that we can sometimes identify a certain ethnicity or group of persons from the way they carry their hair or from its very appearance. Although we do not have any control with the hair we were born with, I agree that our hair is part of our heritage, telling many stories. It is a part of who we are, it forms a portion of us. BUT our hair does NOT define us, it does not define our personality, it does not make us good or bad, but it is merely an accessory that compliments the person we are on the inside.

I can’t tell you how many time over the years, persons have asked me about my ethnicity. If we were to take a journey into our past and take a glimpse into history, we were taught that our ancestors who originated from the African continent were born into slavery and many made the long treacherous voyage to the Caribbean on slave ships where they worked the sugar plantation and picked cotton among other things. To make a long story short, the plantation owners went with the female slaves and these women bore their children. If we want to be technical out race and where we came from, then we are all of a mixed culture and race and nothing is wrong with that. I am pretty sure that if we were to trace our family tree, we would find ancestors of European, Asian and of course African decent and who knows from where else.

While I was studying in University, I was given the title of ‘coloured’ by some of my African colleagues. Before that time I never heard of that term and I did not know the definition of being coloured. I was soon taught that according to them because of the colour of my skin and more importantly the texture of my hair, that I was of a mixed culture, and there is probably some truth to that. As far as I see I am Caribbean, I am Antiguan. My efforts to convince them that we were all cut from the same cloth were in vain. They adamantly stated that I could not be from the same blood line because of my hair texture in particular. Back then I used to get very upset about the whole situation but now I simply smile because it is sad that people no longer take the time to get to know someone and are always quick to judge another person because of their appearance. You see we as Caribbean and black people are special and more so because of our hair. It would make this blog unbearable long if I were to explain in great details about the uniqueness of the curls, kinks and coils of our hair. Our hair is full of so many different textures on one head telling many stories with every twist and curl. We can choose to be curly or straight within hours if we so desire.

The point is not to convince you or even myself of who I am or where I came from because of that I am sure, because I consider myself to be apart of the black race. The point I want to bring across is that I hope that we would not be quick to judge a person because of the colour of their skin or of the texture of their hair.

Matthew chapter 7, verse 1 & 2 states “Do NOT judge, so that you may NOT be judged. For the judgment you make you will be judged and the measure you give, will be the measure you get.”

Martin Luther King Jr. had a dream in 1963 for people of every class and creed to live in love and harmony. 50 years later and we are still divided by a single strand, by the colour of our skin and by the texture of our hair. And in the words of Mr King himself “I have a dream that we will not be judged by the colour of our skin [and I would like to add the texture of our hair] but by the content of our character.”